A first look at Microsoft Lists

A first look at Microsoft Lists Date

>> Hello. My name is Miceile Barrett, I’m a Program Manager at Microsoft, and today I’m going to talk to you about the power of Microsoft Lists. Lists is your smart information tracking app in Microsoft 365 to create, share, and track work across your team. For example, with Microsoft Lists, it is simple to create an issue tracking list to track progress on issues that need to get completed.

Using Lists to create an event itinerary helps plan and coordinate an office conference or business summit with many different speakers and sessions. Using a list to create an asset manager, helps you keep track of physical assets that your team is using, noting who has each device, repair status, check-in and out dates, all while ensuring everyone is informed. Microsoft Lists can be used from within the apps you use every day such as Microsoft Teams. For example, the status reporting list helps my team stay connected as results pour in across the team.

Many of you might already be familiar with the ability to create lists in Microsoft 365 within SharePoint sites. Rest assured, everything I’m showing is an evolution of those capabilities. Our goal is to make those of you already using lists more productive and make it easier than ever to get started, let me show you what I mean. The quickest way to get started with Microsoft Lists is with the new List app available inside the Microsoft 365 App Launcher.

The List app shows you-all the lists you’ve recently accessed, including lists you’ve created, lists that have been shared with you or you’ve recently visited, and lastly, lists you own, which can be viewed separately under this drop-down in “My lists”. You can bookmark list by using the favorite feature, just click on the “Star” next to a list and add it to your favorites so when you’ve returned to the list app, you can get back to the content, super quickly. To create a brand new list, click on the “New” button at the top of the page, from here, you have multiple options to get started. First, the “Blank list” option allows you to start from scratch and define your own structure, formatting, and data. “From Excel”, allows you to upload an Excel file and choose the table of data you’d like to import, from here you can define your data schema and create a new list from your content from Excel.

The third option “From existing list” is great when you want to re-use the structure, formatting, and business rules of a list that’s already in use and provides what you need. To help you get started quickly, you can create a new list from a template, each template comes with pre-defined structure and formatting that help jump-start a common information tracking scenario. Today, I’m working on coordinating my team’s launch event at our June conference. This June event has a lot of different sessions and speakers, so I’m going to use the “Event itinerary” template to keep things organized. After selecting the template, I get a quick preview of what my list is going to look like with some sample data.

The schema looks great to me, so I’m going to go ahead and use this template to create my list. I name my list “Event itinerary – June Conferences”, I can write a quick description of what this list is about. This list will be used to track all sessions and speakers for our June launch event.

I’d like my list to be blue and my icon to show the checklist. This icon will appear in list home and within my list to help me easily identify my content. Lastly, I can choose where to create my new list, the “My list” option, creates a list that only I can see until I decide to share that list with other people. This option is great when you want to work on your own and later share the list with your co-workers when you’re ready to work together, or I can create a list for one of my teams inside of my Microsoft 365 group-connected team sites.

This option is great when you already have a team, up and running and you want all that team stuff to live in one place. For this scenario, I want to create the list and all the content before I share the list with my team, I’m going to save this within “My lists”. Now, at the heart of every list is a table of data you work with, similar to a spreadsheet. After creating the template, we land in my new list with all the schema defined and formatting ready to go. To get items in my list quickly, I’m going to copy and paste my content and I can add new items manually, which I’ll do here.

After I add all of my sessions to this list, I end up with the list that looks like this. I can continue customizing this list by dragging and dropping my columns to the desired name. As I scroll through, you’ll notice that the first column sticks so that I can see all of my content that’s relevant to me. Lastly, I have two options for viewing my data, I can choose the “Fixed height” row that we’re in now, or if I want to see all of my content I can choose the “Autofit height” so that it expands and wraps the text.

Now that I have all my sessions in, let’s layer on a few lightweight processes to ensure that everything stays on track for a successful June event. A key part is making sure that people know they have work to do. First, I need to share my list with my team members, I can use the “Familiar Common Sharing” control, the same control used for sharing files. Within this control, you can easily decide if the recipient has editing or view only permissions. I’m going to share this with my co-worker Nestor, and I’m going to notify him that he now has access to the “Event itinerary” list.

Next, I want to shine a spotlight on the events people need to pay specific attention to. Within my “View formatter”, I can use “Conditional formatting” to highlight the items that match a certain set of criteria. For example, I can easily highlight events where I’m the speaker, I simply edit this rule to show when the speaker is equal to myself, I show the list item as blue.

You can see the preview, over here, where I can now easily see the sessions that I’m responsible for. To collaborate with my teammates on this June conference, I can comment directly on an individual list item. Items that already have comments show the comment icon, when I hover over this icon I can see there are already 23 comments.

I click to “Open the comments” pane and I can leave my own comment on the list item. You can even @mention somebody to send them a notification to call something specific to their attention. Lastly, you can make this list an even more powerful app by setting up rules that automatically remind people when an event is coming up. With my list, I can select “Automate” and “Create a new rule”, I can choose what will trigger my new rule. For me, I want my rule to take place every time a new item is created.

When I select this trigger I can see that when a new item is created, send e-mail to speakers, this will e-mail the person listed in the speaker’s column. To make this rule even more tailored to my needs, I want to send an e-mail specifically to the budget coordinator of this event, Lincoln DeMaris. >> All right. When I added Lincoln, I can now hit “Create” and I’ll see my new rule is created and on and running. Lists are more than just rows and columns of data.

With Microsoft lists, you can customize how your data is visualized. For example, you can view your list data inside configurable cards by switching to our “Gallery view” layout. This layout shows each row of my data as an individual card.

These cards are super helpful when you have a visual element that should be front and center, like images. To change how these cards look, I can format my current view, and I can edit the designer. Inside of the designer, I can customize which fields appear, such as my image field, and I get to choose how it appears by either showing the preview or not and which order it appears in. I additionally want to show my speaker’s preview to see the profile of the speakers. Lastly, I can customize this card to either show the column title or not.

I can save this card view and you can even set this card view as the default view so that your list displays in the gallery view for everyone when they load the list. For my June conference, visualizing all the sessions as a calendar is critical for my team. I can simply create a new calendar view in any list that has one or more date time fields. I can click “Create new view” and select the “Calendar” option.

I’m going to name this my “Session Calendar”, my title will be session name, my start date column will be my start time, and my end date column will be my end time. I’m going to leave this as a public view, so that my team can access it. When I scroll to June, we see all of the different sessions that are occurring during the June event conference. I can open up a single item to see all of the details of that session.

What we’re looking at here is the list form. Every item in a list has a form that makes it easy to edit your items fields and view all the content. This form can be configured, as well. When you open an items form, you can begin customizing the form by editing the columns. You can adjust the ordering of the metadata and the way it appears in the form and decide which fields appear or disappear in the form.

Additionally, you can set conditions to only show certain fields when certain criteria are met. For example, I only want to show my notes field, when I am filling out the form. So I can set this condition on my notes column using a simple if statement. You can see here, that the notes column will only appear if the speaker value is equal to me.

I can hit “Save”. We now see that the notes field will only appear in the form when that specific condition is met. Power users who are willing to dig in can further configure the same form with multiple columns, header, and photo sections, and custom visuals. Let me show you an example.

As you see here, the form is customized to have a header, show three columns of data, and it’s configured to take up the entire page, so it’s easier to view all of the content. To go even further, users can add their own visuals and a footer, as you see here. This June conference is feeling organized and on track. I got my Conditional formatting set up, my new views, helping to visualize the content, and all my rules are up and running to help remind my team of the work that needs to happen. If you and your team love working together in Microsoft Teams, you’ll be delighted to hear that everything I’ve shown you today works great inside teams from start all the way to finish.

>> Hello. My name is Miceile Barrett, I’m a Program Manager at Microsoft, and today I’m going to talk to you about the power of Microsoft Lists. Lists is your smart information tracking app in Microsoft 365 to create, share, and track work across your team. For example, with Microsoft Lists, it is simple to create an issue tracking list to track progress on issues that need to get completed.

Using Lists to create an event itinerary helps plan and coordinate an office conference or business summit with many different speakers and sessions. Using a list to create an asset manager, helps you keep track of physical assets that your team is using, noting who has each device, repair status, check-in and out dates, all while ensuring everyone is informed. Microsoft Lists can be used from within the apps you use every day such as Microsoft Teams. For example, the status reporting list helps my team stay connected as results pour in across the team.

Many of you might already be familiar with the ability to create lists in Microsoft 365 within SharePoint sites. Rest assured, everything I’m showing is an evolution of those capabilities. Our goal is to make those of you already using lists more productive and make it easier than ever to get started, let me show you what I mean. The quickest way to get started with Microsoft Lists is with the new List app available inside the Microsoft 365 App Launcher.

A first look at Microsoft Lists Dating

The List app shows you-all the lists you’ve recently accessed, including lists you’ve created, lists that have been shared with you or you’ve recently visited, and lastly, lists you own, which can be viewed separately under this drop-down in “My lists”. You can bookmark list by using the favorite feature, just click on the “Star” next to a list and add it to your favorites so when you’ve returned to the list app, you can get back to the content, super quickly. To create a brand new list, click on the “New” button at the top of the page, from here, you have multiple options to get started. First, the “Blank list” option allows you to start from scratch and define your own structure, formatting, and data. “From Excel”, allows you to upload an Excel file and choose the table of data you’d like to import, from here you can define your data schema and create a new list from your content from Excel.

The third option “From existing list” is great when you want to re-use the structure, formatting, and business rules of a list that’s already in use and provides what you need. To help you get started quickly, you can create a new list from a template, each template comes with pre-defined structure and formatting that help jump-start a common information tracking scenario. Today, I’m working on coordinating my team’s launch event at our June conference. This June event has a lot of different sessions and speakers, so I’m going to use the “Event itinerary” template to keep things organized. After selecting the template, I get a quick preview of what my list is going to look like with some sample data.

The schema looks great to me, so I’m going to go ahead and use this template to create my list. I name my list “Event itinerary – June Conferences”, I can write a quick description of what this list is about. This list will be used to track all sessions and speakers for our June launch event.

I’d like my list to be blue and my icon to show the checklist. This icon will appear in list home and within my list to help me easily identify my content. Lastly, I can choose where to create my new list, the “My list” option, creates a list that only I can see until I decide to share that list with other people. This option is great when you want to work on your own and later share the list with your co-workers when you’re ready to work together, or I can create a list for one of my teams inside of my Microsoft 365 group-connected team sites.

This option is great when you already have a team, up and running and you want all that team stuff to live in one place. For this scenario, I want to create the list and all the content before I share the list with my team, I’m going to save this within “My lists”. Now, at the heart of every list is a table of data you work with, similar to a spreadsheet. After creating the template, we land in my new list with all the schema defined and formatting ready to go. To get items in my list quickly, I’m going to copy and paste my content and I can add new items manually, which I’ll do here.

After I add all of my sessions to this list, I end up with the list that looks like this. I can continue customizing this list by dragging and dropping my columns to the desired name. As I scroll through, you’ll notice that the first column sticks so that I can see all of my content that’s relevant to me. Lastly, I have two options for viewing my data, I can choose the “Fixed height” row that we’re in now, or if I want to see all of my content I can choose the “Autofit height” so that it expands and wraps the text.

Now that I have all my sessions in, let’s layer on a few lightweight processes to ensure that everything stays on track for a successful June event. A key part is making sure that people know they have work to do. First, I need to share my list with my team members, I can use the “Familiar Common Sharing” control, the same control used for sharing files. Within this control, you can easily decide if the recipient has editing or view only permissions. I’m going to share this with my co-worker Nestor, and I’m going to notify him that he now has access to the “Event itinerary” list.

Next, I want to shine a spotlight on the events people need to pay specific attention to. Within my “View formatter”, I can use “Conditional formatting” to highlight the items that match a certain set of criteria. For example, I can easily highlight events where I’m the speaker, I simply edit this rule to show when the speaker is equal to myself, I show the list item as blue.

You can see the preview, over here, where I can now easily see the sessions that I’m responsible for. To collaborate with my teammates on this June conference, I can comment directly on an individual list item. Items that already have comments show the comment icon, when I hover over this icon I can see there are already 23 comments.

I click to “Open the comments” pane and I can leave my own comment on the list item. You can even @mention somebody to send them a notification to call something specific to their attention. Lastly, you can make this list an even more powerful app by setting up rules that automatically remind people when an event is coming up. With my list, I can select “Automate” and “Create a new rule”, I can choose what will trigger my new rule. For me, I want my rule to take place every time a new item is created.

When I select this trigger I can see that when a new item is created, send e-mail to speakers, this will e-mail the person listed in the speaker’s column. To make this rule even more tailored to my needs, I want to send an e-mail specifically to the budget coordinator of this event, Lincoln DeMaris. >> All right. When I added Lincoln, I can now hit “Create” and I’ll see my new rule is created and on and running. Lists are more than just rows and columns of data.

With Microsoft lists, you can customize how your data is visualized. For example, you can view your list data inside configurable cards by switching to our “Gallery view” layout. This layout shows each row of my data as an individual card.

These cards are super helpful when you have a visual element that should be front and center, like images. To change how these cards look, I can format my current view, and I can edit the designer. Inside of the designer, I can customize which fields appear, such as my image field, and I get to choose how it appears by either showing the preview or not and which order it appears in. I additionally want to show my speaker’s preview to see the profile of the speakers. Lastly, I can customize this card to either show the column title or not.

I can save this card view and you can even set this card view as the default view so that your list displays in the gallery view for everyone when they load the list. For my June conference, visualizing all the sessions as a calendar is critical for my team. I can simply create a new calendar view in any list that has one or more date time fields. I can click “Create new view” and select the “Calendar” option.

I’m going to name this my “Session Calendar”, my title will be session name, my start date column will be my start time, and my end date column will be my end time. I’m going to leave this as a public view, so that my team can access it. When I scroll to June, we see all of the different sessions that are occurring during the June event conference. I can open up a single item to see all of the details of that session.

What we’re looking at here is the list form. Every item in a list has a form that makes it easy to edit your items fields and view all the content. This form can be configured, as well. When you open an items form, you can begin customizing the form by editing the columns. You can adjust the ordering of the metadata and the way it appears in the form and decide which fields appear or disappear in the form.

Additionally, you can set conditions to only show certain fields when certain criteria are met. For example, I only want to show my notes field, when I am filling out the form. So I can set this condition on my notes column using a simple if statement. You can see here, that the notes column will only appear if the speaker value is equal to me.

I can hit “Save”. We now see that the notes field will only appear in the form when that specific condition is met. Power users who are willing to dig in can further configure the same form with multiple columns, header, and photo sections, and custom visuals. Let me show you an example.

As you see here, the form is customized to have a header, show three columns of data, and it’s configured to take up the entire page, so it’s easier to view all of the content. To go even further, users can add their own visuals and a footer, as you see here. This June conference is feeling organized and on track. I got my Conditional formatting set up, my new views, helping to visualize the content, and all my rules are up and running to help remind my team of the work that needs to happen. If you and your team love working together in Microsoft Teams, you’ll be delighted to hear that everything I’ve shown you today works great inside teams from start all the way to finish.

You can create new lists directly inside Teams using the same creation experience I showed earlier. Or you can bring existing lists inside a Team’s channel as a tab using the list app. Rest assured that as your team grows and you configure views, formatting columns, and rules inside your lists, everything will work the same way across Microsoft 365, including any custom forums you create for your list. Now, of course, the primary use of lists inside “Teams” is to have conversations about what you’re working on.

Every item in a list can have its own connected conversation around it. You can view those conversations in the context of a channel or the context of that individual list item. This is super useful when a list has context inside of a specific channel. What I’ve shown you today is powerful on its own. If you need to further customize your forms and design workflows, you can connect your lists to the Power Platform using PowerApps for dynamic forms and Power Automate for more complex steps through a flow.

Microsoft is committed to making lists the best way to create, share, and track information. This means making them work the way you do, in the browser, inside of Teams, and SharePoint. And yes, on your mobile device. We’ve heard from our customers, that they want the full power of lists on the go.

So we are proud to announce that we’re hard at work on lists app for both iOS and Android. This app will give you access to all of the lists you’ve been working on, including the list you star as favorites. From here, you can create new lists directly from your phone, including the ability to start from any of our templates, such as the “Event itinerary” template we’re previewing now. When you use the template, you’ll have the ability to select the list color and icon, as well as update the name and description. Simply add new items to your list with the familiar form an editing controls such as the text and choice fields.

Once your content is added, you can scroll, filter, and swipe your way around any list, and you can edit data with a single tap on your mobile device. Thank you for your time today. I hope this demo tour gives you a first look at Microsoft Lists and all the powerful ways it helps you and your team track information across your business.

Thank you for watching.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *